NYC Subway in the seventies

Erik Calonius took these photos of the New York subway system in 1973.

(via typographicartstuff)

10.Nov.2012 - 7 notes - permalink - comment - reblog

A Falling Horizon by Heidi de Gier

For years, Hannie de Vos and her children had a sheep farm on the Sophiapolder, a small island in the river the Noord. Every morning they would row across the river to take care of the animals. But they were forced to leave their home. The dike will be breached to create new nature: a fresh-water tidal marsh. Photographer Heidi de Gier closely followed the family and the nature on the island for a year. Journalist Tracy Metz interviewed those involved and wrote The Sophiapolder: farewell in five acts.

The book entitled A Falling Horizon, is a rich recording of a full year of change. It was designed by Hans Gremmen, a talented book designer. I just bought the book, I couldn’t resist.

(via conveyormagazine)

06.Nov.2012 - 3 notes - permalink - comment - reblog

Powerful images of #muslimrage

Twitter users — Muslim and non-Muslim alike — took over the #muslimrage hashtag by the thousands on Monday to mock Newsweek’s immediately infamous cover story and its accompanying cynical social media strategy, registering their dismay with the most hilarious tweets possible. Read some of them at Gawker. Beautiful accompanying photos above also from Gawker.

(via gawker)

29.Sep.2012 - 3 notes - permalink - comment - reblog

Julian Germain

For every minute you are angry you lose sixty seconds of happiness (SteidlMack, 2005) by Julian Germain

I got this lovely book from a good friend :) it has the best cover to begin with, but it gets even better inside. It’s a series of photographs made over 8 years of the quiet, contemplative existence of Charles Snelling, an elderly man living alone in a small house in Portsmouth. I’m enjoying this book so much so I thought I’d share my joy :)

Julian about his book:

"I met Charles Albert Lucien Snelling on a Saturday in April, 1992. He lived in a typical two up two down terraced house amongst many other two up two down terraced houses… It was yellow and orange. In that respect it was totally different from every other house on the street…. ….Charlie was a simple, gentle, man. He loved flowers and the names of flowers. He loved colour and surrounded himself with colour. He loved his wife. Without ever trying or intending to, he showed me that the most important things in life cost nothing at all. He was my antidote to modern living."

"For every minute you are angry you lose sixty seconds of happiness’ is a template model for what critical engagement should try to achieve in our day and age: forget the ‘winners’ and ‘losers’ and provide examples of people who operate in a different forcefield. People who are not grasping, not filled with self-importance and not embittered, people with a profound understanding of who they are and what they stand for, something that cuts across all cultures.”
Hans Aarsman, from ‘Do we just keep complaining about injustice or do we set an example?’ Published in the book New Commitment, in architecture, art and design. NAI Publishers.”

24.Jun.2012 - 3 notes - permalink - comment - reblog

Nico Krijno

Nico Krijno renewed his tumblr with some great new photographs, he’s working like mad, new pictures almost every day!! Have a look!

15.Jun.2012 - 5 notes - permalink - comment - reblog

William Eggleston - Chromes

disturber-magazine:

William Eggleston - Chromes

04.Jun.2012 - reblogged from disturber-magazine with 27 notes - permalink - comment - reblog

William Eggleston - Chromes Volume 2

William Eggleston - Chromes Volume 2

04.Jun.2012 - reblogged from disturber-magazine with 16 notes - permalink - comment - reblog

William Eggleston - Chromes

disturber-magazine:

William Eggleston - Chromes

William Eggleston has a self-imposed rule when it comes to his photographic process - he famously restricts himself to only ever taking one picture of one thing. This somewhat spartan point-and-shoot approach and his subsequent glorification of the mundane has influenced everyone from Juergen Teller and Wolfgang Tillmans to Martin Parr. A new tome, entitled ‘Chromes’, revolves around his early experimentation with colour and composition between 1969 and 1974, at a time when ‘black and white’ was still the byword for art photography.

Steidl’s meaty volume in three cloth-bound parts, with text by curator Thomas Weski, presents Eggleston’s early Memphis imagery. It reflects on his stellar depiction of Southern America in the 1970s, which still prompts scores of fans to head out on US road-trips seeking to capture their own piece of the ‘Americana’ pictorial pie.

Designed by Gerhard Steidl and Eggleston and put together with the help of his sons, William Eggleston III and Winston, the publication brings together over 5,000 Kodachromes and Ektachromes (the transparency films that used to be the standard in the 1960s and 1970s).

via | Wallpaper

William Eggleston - Chromes

disturber-magazine:

William Eggleston - Chromes

William Eggleston has a self-imposed rule when it comes to his photographic process - he famously restricts himself to only ever taking one picture of one thing. This somewhat spartan point-and-shoot approach and his subsequent glorification of the mundane has influenced everyone from Juergen Teller and Wolfgang Tillmans to Martin Parr. A new tome, entitled ‘Chromes’, revolves around his early experimentation with colour and composition between 1969 and 1974, at a time when ‘black and white’ was still the byword for art photography.

Steidl’s meaty volume in three cloth-bound parts, with text by curator Thomas Weski, presents Eggleston’s early Memphis imagery. It reflects on his stellar depiction of Southern America in the 1970s, which still prompts scores of fans to head out on US road-trips seeking to capture their own piece of the ‘Americana’ pictorial pie.

Designed by Gerhard Steidl and Eggleston and put together with the help of his sons, William Eggleston III and Winston, the publication brings together over 5,000 Kodachromes and Ektachromes (the transparency films that used to be the standard in the 1960s and 1970s).

via | Wallpaper

04.Jun.2012 - reblogged from disturber-magazine with 20 notes - permalink - comment - reblog

Alexander Rodchenko ‘graphic’ photographer

Alexander Rodchenko’s photographs, he looked at the world with graphic designy eyes. Take a look at his art chronologically ordered here, to get an idea of his development as an artist.

(via cavetocanvas)

26.May.2012 - 4 notes - permalink - comment - reblog

Eric Coleman (Mochilla) photography

Great photography by Eric Coleman, he’s part of a photography studio Mochilla. They photograph alot of hiphop artists and other musicians. I love the colors and the raw ‘sloppy’ (by lack of a better word) feel they have. No. 2,3 and 5 are from his series Knew Orleans.

18.May.2012 - 1 note - permalink - comment - reblog