The (Extra) Ordinary

I don’t usually plug myself at dirty.pixel, but this time I have to tell you… I just GRADUATED!!! and now own a Bachelor in Graphic Design! :D yay! :D

The last couple of months I’ve been busy with my graduation project The (Extra) Ordinary. Above are some pictures from the Graduation Show last week at the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague. It was a blast, lots of nice people, lots of art, lots of sun, lots of talks. What more could you wish for?

Go to suzannebakkum.com if you wanna know more about my project, if you have any questions just ask, i like questions :)

Now that I’m officially done with school I will be posting more regularly, like I used to :)

see you around :)

(and helloooo summer, I will join your party now :))))

The (Extra) Ordinary

I don’t usually plug myself at dirty.pixel, but this time I have to tell you… I just GRADUATED!!! and now own a Bachelor in Graphic Design! :D yay! :D

The last couple of months I’ve been busy with my graduation project The (Extra) Ordinary. Above are some pictures from the Graduation Show last week at the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague. It was a blast, lots of nice people, lots of art, lots of sun, lots of talks. What more could you wish for?

Go to suzannebakkum.com if you wanna know more about my project, if you have any questions just ask, i like questions :)

Now that I’m officially done with school I will be posting more regularly, like I used to :)

see you around :)

(and helloooo summer, I will join your party now :))))

18.Jul.2014 - 3 notes - permalink - comment - reblog

"

… one could argue we reached that saturation point quite some time ago. Anything in print that appears new today can be considered a variation on age old themes. Purely from a formal point of view, that Layered Thing was fairly well explored by Piet Swart and Wolfgang Weingart. That Anti-Mastery Thing was pretty well exhausted by Fluxus and Punk, that Deconstructivist Thing was long ago mastered by just about everybody from Apollinaire to Edward Fella and that Illegible Thing was difficult to top after Victor Moscoso and Wes Wilson were done battling over who could make the reader more cross-eyed. The only significant contribution introduced to graphic design in the last 10 years or so, as Laurie Haycock Makela once pointed out, might have less to do with anything visual than with how design is produced and who it is produced by.

“ … let’s imagine for a second that there will be no Next Big Thing in design. At least not for a while. Nothing to catch the attention of the design press, to sweep all the design awards, to receive all the lecture invitations, to function as a source of inspiration and discussion for all. Here’s an idea to fill that void; we can try our hand at judging design by its content, by the ideas and messages that it attempts to communicate. Imagine design competitions picking winners based solely on the value of what they communicate, instead of how they communicate. The moral, ethical and political biases of the judges would come to the fore, for sure, but no more or less than the formal biases of judges who rule competitions now. Design would be discussed only as it affects the message. For instance, a submission could be considered of great public value but would not win an award simply because the design, although formally stunning, obscured the message. What would the AIGA annual look like then?

"

Graphic Design and The Next Big Thing by Rudy Vanderlans, Emigre 39 (via booksfromthefuture)

02.Jun.2014 - reblogged from booksfromthefuture with 22 notes - permalink - comment - reblog

Nina Paim

Fabulous riso-printed books by Nina Paim and Angelo van de Wiel: The Cinema Tow Series – Meta-film, Gore Galore & Stop the Image. Nina Paim graduated at the Rietveld in 2012.

(via booksfromthefuture)

Nina Paim

Fabulous riso-printed books by Nina Paim and Angelo van de Wiel: The Cinema Tow Series – Meta-film, Gore Galore & Stop the Image. Nina Paim graduated at the Rietveld in 2012.

(via booksfromthefuture)

15.May.2014 - reblogged from booksfromthefuture with 541 notes - permalink - comment - reblog

Crazy Sexy Cool

Crazy Sexy Cool by Jaesuk Huh

(via type-lover)

Crazy Sexy Cool

Crazy Sexy Cool by Jaesuk Huh

(via type-lover)

13.May.2014 - reblogged from expira with 270 notes - permalink - comment - reblog

Book Covers by Jan Vermeulen

Jan Vermeulen’s excellent type based covers for Dutch writer Jan Wolkers. The back of the book is just as important as the front, as you can see with Turks Fruit and De Walg Vogel. They were a team Vermeulen and Wolkers, until Vermeulen’s death in 1985 he did all the covers for Jan Wolkers. You can see more covers (with the back) over here.

Book Covers by Jan Vermeulen

Jan Vermeulen’s excellent type based covers for Dutch writer Jan Wolkers. The back of the book is just as important as the front, as you can see with Turks Fruit and De Walg Vogel. They were a team Vermeulen and Wolkers, until Vermeulen’s death in 1985 he did all the covers for Jan Wolkers. You can see more covers (with the back) over here.

20.Apr.2014 - 10 notes - permalink - comment - reblog

Processing

A line as the relation between two points, characterized with its stiffness, strength and arithmetic distance. A mesh as the result of dispositional and transformational operations of lines overlapping, crossing, netting each other.

I find these sketches in processing so intriguing. They’re done by Lab for Environmental Design Strategies founded in 2008 by Daniel Köhler and Rasa Navasaityte. I wish I was coding savy.

Processing

A line as the relation between two points, characterized with its stiffness, strength and arithmetic distance. A mesh as the result of dispositional and transformational operations of lines overlapping, crossing, netting each other.

I find these sketches in processing so intriguing. They’re done by Lab for Environmental Design Strategies founded in 2008 by Daniel Köhler and Rasa Navasaityte. I wish I was coding savy.

05.Apr.2014 - 6 notes - permalink - comment - reblog

Stigmatypie: 19th-Century Dot Matrix Printing

stewf:

Stigmatypie: 19th-Century Dot Matrix Printing

Tonight I found an odd bitmappy portrait of Gutenburg (top) in a fold-out spread of Harpel’s Typograph, a type specimen from 1870. “What is a stigmatypie?”, I wondered. Some cursory research reveals it was a pioneering, but seldom used, technique for producing halftone images with very small type. It was developed around 1867 by Carl Fasol of Vienna.

Stigmatypie is described in the American Encyclopaedia of Printing (1871):

image

Pictures made with tiny periods of metal type! Not only was this a Victorian precursor to dot matrix printing, but also (in a way) ASCII art.

Read more from John McVey and Peter Fasol (Dutch), who is the source of the other images above, from Carl Fasol’s Album der Buchdruckerkunst.

Stigmatypie: 19th-Century Dot Matrix Printing

stewf:

Stigmatypie: 19th-Century Dot Matrix Printing

Tonight I found an odd bitmappy portrait of Gutenburg (top) in a fold-out spread of Harpel’s Typograph, a type specimen from 1870. “What is a stigmatypie?”, I wondered. Some cursory research reveals it was a pioneering, but seldom used, technique for producing halftone images with very small type. It was developed around 1867 by Carl Fasol of Vienna.

Stigmatypie is described in the American Encyclopaedia of Printing (1871):

image

Pictures made with tiny periods of metal type! Not only was this a Victorian precursor to dot matrix printing, but also (in a way) ASCII art.

Read more from John McVey and Peter Fasol (Dutch), who is the source of the other images above, from Carl Fasol’s Album der Buchdruckerkunst.

30.Mar.2014 - reblogged from pixelsinthewild with 61 notes - permalink - comment - reblog

SPATS: Super Special Background Patterns by Hironori Yasuda

These wonderful patterns are part of a series of 8 books by Hironori Yasuda, a Japanese designer. The books were published in the late 80s, and by now are pretty rare.

(via globule)

SPATS: Super Special Background Patterns by Hironori Yasuda

These wonderful patterns are part of a series of 8 books by Hironori Yasuda, a Japanese designer. The books were published in the late 80s, and by now are pretty rare.

(via globule)

15.Mar.2014 - 27 notes - permalink - comment - reblog

Mirtha Dermisache

"I started writing and the result was something unreadable."

Mirtha Dermisache (1940-2012) from Argentina, practiced asemic writing since the early 1970s. It is a wordless open semantic form of writing. The word asemic means having no specific semantic content. Asemic writing seeks to make the reader hover in a state between reading and looking.

Mirtha Dermisache

"I started writing and the result was something unreadable."

Mirtha Dermisache (1940-2012) from Argentina, practiced asemic writing since the early 1970s. It is a wordless open semantic form of writing. The word asemic means having no specific semantic content. Asemic writing seeks to make the reader hover in a state between reading and looking.

07.Mar.2014 - 1,388 notes - permalink - comment - reblog

3D-print experiment

Austrian artist LIA started experimenting with a 3D-printer and she shows all her discoveries on her tumblr. She says she’s not interested in creating 3D models in a 3D programme and then simply have them printed out. She rather wants to know what can be achieved with the actual properties of filament and the movements of the printhead.

It’s pretty amazing to see all of her discoveries from beginning to end.

(via bit.craft)

3D-print experiment

Austrian artist LIA started experimenting with a 3D-printer and she shows all her discoveries on her tumblr. She says she’s not interested in creating 3D models in a 3D programme and then simply have them printed out. She rather wants to know what can be achieved with the actual properties of filament and the movements of the printhead.

It’s pretty amazing to see all of her discoveries from beginning to end.

(via bit.craft)

27.Feb.2014 - 30 notes - permalink - comment - reblog